LISTING OF YARMOUTH NEWSPAPERS

The first attempt towards establishing a newspaper in Yarmouth was made by Mr. Younghusband, of St. John, N. B., in 1827, but it died in the bud.

The Yarmouth Telegraph Messrs. Jackson & L'Estrange produced the first newspaper in Yarmouth, and indeed in the portion of Nova Scotia west of Halifax. It was called the Yarmouth Telegraph, and made its first appearance on Friday, November 25, 1831.

On the 24th February, 1832, after issuing 12 numbers, the proprietors of the Telegraph deemed it judicious to add to the heading of the paper Shelburne Advertiser, with the motto: "The noblest motive is the public good."

The firm of Jackson & L'Estrange, proprietors of the Telegraph, was dissolved by mutual consent on the 13th July, 1832, Mr. Jackson continuing the business.

The publication of the Telegraph ceased with its issue of October 26th, 1832, having been issued 45 times. Several of the numbers were printed on half sheets and there were several omissions of a week or ten days at a time. From that date till August 9th, 1833, the Western portion of Nova Scotia was without a newspaper.

The printing press and type used for the Telegraph were imported from Bermuda in 1831 by Jackson L'Estrange. The press and type were used for printing the Herald from its establishment in August, 1833, until May, 1836. The press was then disposed of to Mr. James Bowes, of Halifax, and was afterwards purchased by George T. Fenerty, to print the St. John News, the first penny paper in the maritime provinces. It was a very primitive machine, with a wooden frame, stone bed and wooden (mahogany) platen, printing only one page at one impression.

The Yarmouth Herald

A. Lawson, founder of the Yarmouth Herald

The first number of the Herald was issued on Friday, August 9th, 1833. It was a sheet 18x24, and was well printed, at the rate of 15s per annum, payable half-yearly.

The Yarmouth Herald was issued semi-weekly (Tuesday and Friday) Dec. 22nd, 1843, and was the first semi-weekly newspaper published in Nova Scotia. It continued to be issued semi-weekly until August 29th, 1850, when it again appeared as a weekly.

On the 21st August, 1845, the management of the Herald was given to Mr. Angus M. Gidney, and it continued under his control until December, 1850. It reverted to its original founder, Mr. A. Lawson, and began publication, after a few weeks' delay, February 15th, 1851.

The Herald office was first located in the rear half and whole of the upper floor of Nathan Butler's building, corner of Main and Queen streets. In 1835 it was moved to the small building, owned by O. Viets Dakin, on the present site of Mrs. Geddes' house, Butler's hill. In 1837 it was moved to the eastern corner of James Bond's block, Argyle street, adjoining store of Thomas Barnard. In 1840 a new building was erected by the proprietor on the south-west corner of his homestead lot, corner of Main and Barnard streets, where it remained until 1845, when Mr. Lawson removed to Pictou.

In 1850 Mr. Lawson again became editor of the paper, and located the plant in the rear of his general store, in Moody's row. The physical location of the office of the Herald changed many times over the years. A number of these moves are outlined in J. Murray Lawson's Yarmouth Past and Present, page 27.

The Yarmouth Herald was one of the longest running weekly newspapers in Canada. It ceased publication in 1966. Many other newspapers were established in Yarmouth during the time of the Herald's publication.

The following is a list of all the known newspapers that were published in Yarmouth County. The list is arranged chronologically by the year of establishment. Also given in the list is the newspaper title, the year that the newspaper ceased publication, and frequency of publication.

Note: There were years around the turn of the century when Yarmouth had up to four different newspapers being published at the same time.

START DATE NAME OF NEWSPAPER END DATE FREQUENCY
1831 Yarmouth Telegraph 1832 Weekly
1832 Yarmouth Telegraph and Shelburne Advertiser 1832 Weekly
1833 Yarmouth Herald and Western Advertiser 1843 Weekly
1839 Conservative 1840 Weekly
1843 Yarmouth Herald 1943 Semi-weekly and weekly
1843 Yarmouth Morning Courier 1844 Semi-weekly
1844 Yarmouth Courier and Colonial Farmer 1848 Semi-monthly
1848 Temperance Gazette 1850 Weekly
1855 Yarmouth Tribune 1883 Semi-weekly and weekly
1867 Argus 1867 Weekly
1874 Bumblebee 1874 [?] Unknown
1874 Liquor Dealer's Advocate [?] Unknown
1879 Observer [?] Semi-monthly
1880 L'Avenir [?] Weekly
1883 Yarmouth Times and Western Counties Journal 1890 Semi-weekly
1885 News 1888 [?] Weekly
1885 Telephone 1885 [?] Unknown
1885 Telegram 1891 Weekly
1889 Semaphore 1889 [?] Quarterly
1890 Yarmouth Times 1923 [?] Semi-weekly and weekly
1890 Yarmouth Light 1966 Weekly
1891 Yarmouth Telegram 1943 Weekly
1896 Yarmouth Daily News 1899 Daily
1898 Daily Times 1900 Daily
1898 Yarmouth Weekly News 1899 Weekly
1900 Free Baptist Banner 1906 [?] Monthly
1906 Flowers Puzzler [?] Monthly
1906 X-Ray 1907 [?] Unknown
1907 Yarmouth Daily Globe 1909 Daily
1908 Yarmouth Daily Post 1918 [?] Daily
1909 Yarmouth Globe 1912 [?] Weekly
1935 Yarmouth Advertiser 1937 [?] Weekly
1937 Petit Courrier du Sud-Ouest de la Nouvelle-Écosse 1972 Weekly
1939 [?] Boom 1942 Monthly
1942 Depth Charge 1945 Monthly
1943 Yarmouth Herald-Telegram 1949 Weekly
1948 Yarmouth Recorder 1948 Bi-weekly
1950 Yarmouth Herald 1966 Weekly
1950 Yarmouth Telegram 1950 Weekly
1966 Light Herald 1978 Weekly
1966 Vanguard Present Weekly and semi-weekly
1966 Voix de Clare 1970 Weekly
1967 Dialogue 1984 [?] Monthly
1967 Viking 1981 [?] Bi-weekly (part of year)
1968 Sou' Wester Present Twice monthly
1972 Petit Courrier de la Nouvelle-Écosse 1977 Weekly
1973 Farm Focus Present Semi-monthly
1977 Courrier de la Nouvelle-Écosse Present Weekly
1979 Western Beacon 1979 Monthly
1980 Arts Tab 1981 Monthly
1985 Vanguard Weekend 1986 Weekly
1987 Gateway Gazette 1987 Weekly
1989 Yarmouth Sun 1989 Weekly
1992 Dollar Saver 1993 [?] Irregular
1994 Maritime Atlantic Timepasser Magazine 1994 [?] Irregular

Take a look at ATCHA's newspaper collection on microfilm.

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